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Fisher 800-T

Solid State Stereophonic AM/FM Receiver (1972)

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Fisher 800-T


Tuning range: FM, MW

Power output: 65 watts per channel into 8Ω (stereo)

Frequency response: 20Hz to 25kHz

Total harmonic distortion: 0.5%

Damping factor: 30

Input sensitivity: 2.5mV (MM), 300mV (DIN), 250mV (line)

Signal to noise ratio: 60dB (MM), 65dB (line)

Channel separation: 45dB (MM), 50dB (line)

Output: 400mV (line)

Dimensions: 16-7/8 x 4-13/16 x 14-1/2 inches

Weight: 30lbs

Year: 1970


instruction/owners manual   English - torskdoc

10001 on service manual   English - torskdoc

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re: 800-T

I picked mine up at a church rummage sale for $30 in 2006, took it home and let it sit in the corner.
Two years ago i decided to plug it in, ran on a pair of AR5's and then some mid 80's ADS 3 ways. Previously I had been listening to my Dynakit ST70, and my Dad's McIntosh MC-30's with vinyl or CD. When I tried this Fisher out, playing some jazz records, classic rock, etc., I was shocked by the apparant high power reserve when adjusting the volume. This unit has oodles of power. There's something about the sound that boarders on vacuum tube and solid state in quality. No Kenwood,Yamaha, Sherwood, or whatever can do what this receiver can sonically. Since putting 50 hours plus into listening on this 800-T, a couple very large caps inside started to leak. No big deal, Mouser to the recue for top end Nichicon caps. The sound quality overall on this Fisher is so pleasant when listening to vinyl now that a pro DJ friend of mine says that I am now addicted to the "black crack", aka records/wax/LP/vinyl. I am starting to replace my favorite albums on CD with the vinyl version if I can find it. I know that I cannot ever sell my Fisher 800-T, it's a special piece worthy of an entire recap (if it comes to that), because I would always regret doing so. Proud to see American made, by American hands, was produced around the time I was born. I'm a lucky owner for sure. They sell for about $950+ on EBay now, tempting but it just sounds too good to part with.

re: 800-T

doing a total recap on the 800-T won't change the sonic qualities of the 800-T. It was designed by the same team of German engineers that designed all of the iconic tube gear of the late 50's thru the 60's for FISHER. If anything it will clean it up some, but nothing drastic. I did my 500-TX 4 years ago and absolutely love it. I A/B between it and my 800-C that has been rebuilt with old stock tubes, Nichicon electrolytics, and Cornell Dublier DME caps, with Russian K-73 PIO's for output's. Not a lot of difference between them. The 500-TX sounds almost as tube-y as the 800-C, but you know it's S.S. I have the RK-30 remote for the AUTO Scan and use it a lot (especially when my back is hurting). Wish the 800-C had that. The one thing that the 500-TX/800-T has on the 800-C is total wattage, but the 800-C is no slouch.

re: 800-T

The 800-T is a 500-TX with a different colored front panel, and a Multivoltage Transformer. A wired remote(RK-30) for the AUTOSCAN Tuning was included with the 800-T.

This website is not affiliated with or sponsored by Fisher. To purchase 800-T spares or accessories, please contact the company via their website or visit an authorised retailer.