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Modular Component System 6700 Direct-Drive Turntable

Howdy Everybody,

I have owned a Modular Component System 6700 DD Turntable. It is a fantastic turntable, without a doubt the best I have ever owned. When I acquired it, the strobe light worked, although you could see it only when the room was completely dark. I replaced the bulb with a new one that I ordered from eBay. The bulb worked perfectly when it was hooked up to a battery, but when it was soldered to the circuit board, it was even more dim than the first one. Puzzled, I checked the resistor and realized that it read "open" on my multi-meter. The resistor read 10K(ohm symbol)J three times on different sides. I cannot find a proper replacement for it. If anyone can help me out on this I would greatly appreciate it.

Thanks,
Floyd 823



Re: Modular Component System 6700 Direct-Drive Turntable

What type of lamp is it? If it is neon then it should be powered by 120 volts AC and there needs to be a resistor in series with it (most likely 22k to 47k). If it is LED then it could be most anything with a DC source. If it is incandescent then a 10k resistor would be too high.

Re: Modular Component System 6700 Direct-Drive Turntable

The lamp is neon from a 60hz AC source

Re: Modular Component System 6700 Direct-Drive Turntable

Your original strobe lamp is a super high brightness neon bulb variant of the NE-2 type which all the Japanese turntable makers used back in the day. The giveaway is the 10K ohm resistor. They are no longer available new but can be found on ebay on small strobe circuit boards pulled from turntables. Do an ebay search for turntable strobe -you want both the bulb and the resistor. (this one will work;
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Technics-SL-B350-Turntable-Parts-Strobe-Lamp/13...
Replace both your bulb and resistor from one of these boards and you will be good to go.
Be aware that a modern NE-2 neon bulb requires a 100K ohm resistor. There is also available new the NE-2H variation. This is the high brightness version (but still no where near as bright as the original bulb) and requires a 33K ohm resistor.
I don't understand what you posted when you said "I checked the resistor and realized that it read "open" on my multi-meter. The resistor read 10K(ohm symbol)J three times on different sides."
Rick