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Nakamichi 700

Three Head Cassette Deck (1973)

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Nakamichi 700

Description

The Nakamichi 700 was created in response to the demand for a machine that could offer the essential performances of our highly acclaimed Model 1000 Tri Tracer, but at a more modest cost.

Since a compromise in performance was unthinkable, the alternative was to simplify the design and develop new construction techniques that would permit cost reductions while maintaining quality.

And Nakamichi engineers succeeded brilliantly. In almost every respect, the Nakamichi 700 equalled the performance of the 1000 Tri Tracer. Nor is this surprising, for the 700 employs the same advanced transport system and shares most of the features of the more expensive model.

Central to both Tri Tracers are three separate heads - erase, record and playback. The same configuration employed in professional reel-to-reel decks.

Nor does the similarity end there. For both Nakamichi Tri Tracers achieve a level of performance that had previously been regarded as, all but, impossible in the cassette format.

Specifications

  • Type: 3-head, single compact cassette deck

    Track System: 4-track, 2-channel stereo

    Tape Speed: 4.75 cm/s

    Heads: 1 x record, 1 x playback, 1 x erase

    Tape Type: type I, CrO2

    Noise Reduction: B

    Frequency Response: 35Hz to 20kHz  (Cr02 tape)

    Signal to Noise Ratio: 65dB  (dolby B)

    Wow and Flutter: 0.05%

    Total Harmonic Distortion: 1.5%

    Input: 100mV (line), 0.5mV (mic)

    Output: 1V (line)

    Semiconductors: 115 x transistors, 51 x diodes, 9 x IC

    Dimensions: 20-1/2 x 10-11/16 x 5-1/8 inches

    Weight: 28lbs

    Accessories: optional remote control

    Year: 1973

  • Type: 3-head, single compact cassette deck

    Track System: 4-track, 2-channel stereo

    Tape Speed: 4.75 cm/s

    Heads: 1 x record, 1 x playback, 1 x erase

    Tape Type: type I, CrO2

    Noise Reduction: B

    Frequency Response: 35Hz to 20kHz  (Cr02 tape)

    Signal to Noise Ratio: 65dB  (dolby B)

    Wow and Flutter: 0.05%

    Total Harmonic Distortion: 1.5%

    Input: 50mV (line), 0.2mV (mic)

    Output: 1V (line)

    Semiconductors: 138 x transistors, 54 x diodes, 9 x IC

    Dimensions: 20-11/16 x 10-11/16 x 5-5/8 inches

    Weight: 28lbs

    Accessories: optional remote control

    Year: 1973

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Reviews

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rating
Reviewed Jul 31st, 2017 by gerhard wartha

It was made from 1973 to 1977.
This cassette deck was made like an open reel deck
at this time. Just a little smaller.
Big belts. Big Head Base Solenoid.
It sounds like them if it is maintained.
Build in 400Hz test-tone to set bias Level,equalization. And for setting, the record head azimuth.

rating
Reviewed May 01st, 2017 by zarman

I'll add my feedback on this deck. Firstly it is not built like a tank. It has some weak design issues that is also the same issue with the 600 deck. The circuit boards slide into each other and is held by plastic slots. They don't click together so it is friction that holds them in. Over time the plastic will expand and the circuits become loose leading to many issues like no sound, graininess and popping sound like a bad pot syndrome. The capstan motor wouldn't turn on because of this bad connection. What i did to solve this was to use two layers of painters green tape applied to the back of the board where it slides into the plastic connector. The thickness gave it a snug fit and it won't come out ever again! I did this to all of the circuit board connections. WORKS LIKE A CHARM!

This deck sounds simply amazing when it is dialed in. I like it much more than any of the modern decks I've had like the newer Naks and Tascam 122 MKIII. The sound is more realistic and true to the real thing. The problem with modern decks is that it emphasizes the upper frequencies and treble is too high and the vocals are hissy rather than natural. Listen carefully to the vocals and hear how close it is to a person's voice. Our voice isn't trebly and I hate decks that adds too much treble to everything. Older decks were better because they didn't use microprocessors. They had wires running everywhere!

I love the sound of this deck. I don't use dolby at all. It's shiat really. Never sounds right.

rating
Reviewed Jun 15th, 2015 by rvkruz

The Nakamichi 700 can make music sound real, sometimes better than live, unless the concert has very good acoustics.

There is no dulling of the HF with its discrete Dolby B circuits.

Excellent in all aspects, well built, and great looking. It is the best of my analog sources.

rating
Reviewed Dec 13th, 2014 by lashing

I got my 700 by chance. A collector thought it didn't work anymore and sold it to me cheap. It just needed the ribbon cables reset.

I have a Nak 202e as well with the flipping tape. The 700 sounds better. More than a decade of technology improvements between them but the 700 is just richer overall and plays tapes the 202 stutters on.

Only thing I don't like about the 700 is the mechanical noise. Doesn't come thru the outputs at all. The machine doesn't however make a fair bit of mechanical noise when spinning tape.

Well produced cassettes sound like reel to reel on this deck. Amazing sound quality especially considering the technology in 73 was in its infancy.

rating
Reviewed Nov 24th, 2014 by bruembry

Hi All,
While I have to say one thing about the Nakamichi 700, it is the best. When I was a 19 in 73 I saw one of decks at a audio store. Just can't remember where I saw it, but I knew one day I would have one. This deck is built like a tank and is designed to last a life-time. It's ability to capture music is the best I have ever heard. OK, time for a little history on my personal time line of cassette decks that I owned. My first cassette deck was a Teac 360s, which I used for about a year, until I ran into a used Teac A450. I would have to say for a two head, the Teac A450 performed vary while. To this day I still have a bunch of cassettes that still play that were recorded on the Teac A450. After the Teac A450, I purchased my first three head cassette deck the Akai GXC-740D. The Akai was great at capturing all of the nuances of vinyl that I recoded from about 1980 up to 1987. As a matter of fact, the Akai was so great in recording, that I added an external DBX 224X noise reduction. With the Akai 740 and the DBX, I could record CD's and play them back in my car without any loss of fidelity. Sadly I wore the 740 out. The tape guides of the 740 went bad and I attempted to replace them, but could never get the 740 to work again. My next three head deck was the Akai GX-8. The GX-8 is a great deck, but there are no adjustments to calibrate the Dolby noise reduction system. I still have the GX-8 and it still works, but it does need some maintenance. So around about 2004 I decided to buy the tape deck that I always wanted and yes I went to Ebay and found my 700. When it arrived it did not work. The tape would move, but there was no sound. So I disassembly the 700 and cleaned all of the board connectors and it started to work. While I had it apart, I replace the belts and the rubber on the idler wheels. The only other maintenance that I perform on the 700 is that I re-solder all of the board edge connectors two years ago. I have never replaced any of the original electronic components on the 700. I do regular clean the heads and use head demagitizer every 10 hours of use.
It is really something that a product produce in 1973 still works as well as the 700. The 700 is just about as old school as you can get. There are no IC's in its signal path. All internal pre-amp stages in the 700 are pure class A. The headphone amplifier is complementary output stage. It all metal construction will last to end of time.
The thing just records and play music with clarity that all of the other tape-decks that I have own over the past 40 years cannot match. The 700 just makes the cassette media HiFi. And as an added plus it works with my DBX 224X. All of my recordings that I have made over the past 40 years are played back on the 700 with the best fidelity.

rating
Reviewed Aug 03rd, 2013 by vacuumnoise

Definetly the best 3 head cassette player I have owned thus far, built like a tank too!

 

Comments

Nakamichi 700TT service manual wanted

I would really appreciate if someone will share service manual for this device.

Nak 700II

Are you looking for the Nak 700II service manual?

Nak 700

Yes, for 700-2 will go too, as well as for 700TT, they are almost similar. If you do have it, is it possible receiving it on my E-mail address?

Antonio Lopez's picture

Nak 700II

I need the operator manual.-

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